Spring Chicken Bone Broth

Not only does bone broth provide a variety of health benefits, it’s also delicious and adds complexity and richness to various dishes when used as an ingredient. It’s easy to make, and is a great way to utilize vegetable and herb scraps!

Ingredients: 

1 organic whole chicken (you can certainly just use the bones for bone broth, but I find using a whole chicken adds more nutritional value as well as flavor. I typically use the leftover cooked meat to make chicken salad)

2 tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar

Water

Salt (I recommend using a nutrient dense salt such as Gray Sea Salt)

In-season spring herbs and vegetables (I like to freeze my vegetable and herbs scraps and use those) You can use any variety you choose, but pick at least 3 different items to use. Consider using these springtime favorites:

  • Kale, dandelion greens, carrots, peas, ramps, broccoli, radishes, shallots, vidalia onions, garlic, celery
  • Parsley, cilantro, tarragon, dill, fennel

Directions:

Add whole chicken to stock pot, cover with water. Add apple cider vinegar and salt (add a generous amount of salt). Allow to sit for 30-45 minutes with no heat—this allows the apple cider vinegar and salt to pull nutrients from the chicken. 

Bring pot to boil and boil chicken for an hour.  As chicken boils, remove “scum” from the surface using a large spoon. 

Remove chicken from the pot and allow it to cool enough to handle. Remove skin, add back to pot. Separate the meat from the bones and add bones  back to the stock pot and return to boil. Save chicken meat for chicken salad, sandwiches, or another quick meal. 

Add your choice of spring vegetables and herbs (or scraps) to the pot. Cover with lid, reduce heat to low and cook for 16-24 hours. You may wish to add more salt, or even add a little lemon juice to the pot for flavor. 

Remove bones from the pot, and strain broth. I prefer to add my broth to mason jars and once sufficiently cooled, refrigerate.  

Enjoy a cup of bone broth on its own, use it as a soup base or for cooking pasta, as a flavorful and nutritious addition to a sauce, stew, or marinade. It is freezable as well—I like to add my bone broth to an ice cube tray and add a cube to pretty much whatever I’m cooking for dinner. The possibilities are endless and delicious!

This delicious, creamy, comforting (and healthy!) soup has been famously circulating in our family for many years. It was originally heard in the 80s by my mother one morning on the radio while we were stuck in traffic. Amazingly, she repeated it over and over in her head until she was able to write it down! And, as they say, the rest is history.

Mushrooms are an amazing protein substitute. Rich and hearty, they provide many vitamins (such as vitamin B, copper, potassium, and iron) and antioxidants (such as glutathione and ergothioneine). They are naturally low in sodium, which is also good for a healthy heart.

Give this easy soup a try on your next cold, frigid day; and it is sure to warm you up—body and soul!

1 small onion, chopped

1 clove garlic, chopped

2T grass-fed butter 

4C chicken broth

¾ lb. each of mushrooms and parsnip, chopped

1t salt, to taste

½ t pepper, to taste

½ t agave (optional)

1C organic sour cream

Saute the onions and garlic in butter until tender. Add mushrooms and cook until the give up their juice and begin boiling. Continue to simmer until juice evaporates and mushrooms begin to fry. (This is important—it gives the soup that wonderful mushroom-y flavor!)

Finely chop parsnips in a food processor (it is much easier). Add to mushroom mix, add chicken stock. Simmer until tender, about 30 minutes.

Stir in sour cream and simmer for a few more minutes, and serve!

I came across this idea online and decided to test it out - I love using silicone muffin tins for baking eggs and leftover veggies for a quick breakfast, but these looked nicely portable and easy to make for breakfast on the run. My initial idea to create a phyllo, pear and prosciutto tart today was derailed by the fact that I always forget phyllo needs a day in the fridge before I can hope to use it - and I was hungry now. So let the testing begin!

Ingredients

  • ½ Shallot, finely chopped
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1-2 tsp fresh grated ginger
  • depending on personal preference (I use 2, sometimes a little more)
  • ½ tsp sea salt 6-8 cups chicken bone broth (or regular chicken stock)
  • ⅓ cup rice
  • 2 chicken breasts
  • 1 tsp soy sauce 
  • Salt and Pepper to taste 
  • Chopped scallions for garnish

Additional Options

  • Sometimes I add a little something extra to my soup. A couple of good options are:
  • 1 portobello mushroom, chopped and added in after first 5 minutes of cooking
  • 1 cup chopped Bok choy, added in after first 5 minutes of cooking
  • Chopped jalapeno or red pepper flakes added to bowl for garnish

Wellness Tip:

After chopping the garlic, let it sit on the cutting board for several minutes, this increases its disease-fighting potential by making an enzyme called allicin more potent.

Directions:

Heat a teaspoon of sesame oil in a large pot on medium high heat. Add onions and sauté 1-2 minutes. Add garlic, sauté another minute, and then add ginger, sautéing an additional minute.

Add stock and bring to a boil. Add salt and soy sauce.
Add raw chicken breasts and rice to pot, continue boiling on medium high heat.

Cook for 10 minutes, remove chicken breasts. Cover pot and cook for an additional 10 minutes.

Chop chicken into small pieces, add back to pot. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Garnish with scallions.

To start your day, I love this savory Congee. It’s packed with several powerhouse food herbs to nourish your body. Enjoy it plain, or with a cup of green tea as an easy way to start your day.

BASIC CONGEE RECIPE

  • 1 cup short grain rice
  • 10 cups broth (or you can use
  • 10 cups water for making a breakfast congee)
  •  1 tsp neutral oil (like coconut)

FOR SAVORY CONGEE (Optional for serving)

  • 1 cup milk, either dairy or soy 
  • Thinly sliced green onions
  • Leftover shredded meat
  • Hard-boiled eggs
  • Julienned carrots
  • Soy sauce
  • Hot sauce
  • Toasted sesame oil

Directions

  1. In the bowl of a large slow-cooker, stir together 1 teaspoon of neutral oil and the short-grain rice until the rice grains are coated. Add the broth (or water) and stir to combine. Place the lid on the slow-cooker, turn heat to ‘LOW’ and allow to cook for 8 hours. Just prior to serving, bump the heat up to ‘HIGH’. If you’re using milk, stir it in now. Re-cover the slow-cooker and allow to cook for 30 minutes. Turn off the cooker, uncover and stir prior to serving.

  2. Options
    1. Drizzle with a little toasted sesame oil, top with sliced green onions, add a few drops of Sriracha and chop a hard-boiled egg. This may not cure the cold, but it sure makes you feel better.
    2. Add chicken, scallions and some diced veggies (before or after cooking) and serve…
    3. Add ground meat, egg yolk, some diced garlic and veggies

  3. Or to start your day, I love this sweet variation below called "8 Treasure Congee". It’s packed with several powerhouse food herbs to nourish your body. Enjoy with a cup of green tea as an easy way to start your day. I usually let this cook overnight and add a little milk of choice to replace part of the water.

In addition to your rice, add:

  • ¼ C pearl barley
  • 6-8 Chinese dates (aka hong zao or jujubes - if can’t get these you can use medjool dates)
  • 1 cinnamon stick or ground cinnamon to taste
  • 1” ginger root peeled and grated (can use powdered ginger as well)
  • 1 t cardamom
  • Gan cao (chinese licorice - about 6g)- this can be omitted if you can’t find it, star anise can be used if you like but it is an entirely different plant)
  • Goji Berries (¼ C)
  • Mulberries (¼ C)
The products and statements made about specific products on this web site have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. All information provided on this web site or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new vitamins, supplements, diet, or exercise program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. Any testimonials on this web site are based on individual results and do not constitute a guarantee that you will achieve the same results.
chevron-down linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram